Discover and share good practice for smarter working universities

The CATS Campaign: raising cancer awareness among students

In the second blog of our student experience series, Ellie Dunstone, a student at Cambridge University, shares with us the experience of the society she is involved with, the Cancer Awareness in Teenagers and young people Society, also known as CATS. Universities have a wide range of societies run by students which include sports, lifestyle choices, religion, hobbies and health. Societies can be valuable to students, learning skills which can support them in their future careers, supporting their own mental and physical health as well as others, demonstrating that there can be more to the student experience than the course.

A focus on student mental health services: Nightline

In the last of our Student Mental Health and wellbeing series, this blog focuses on Nightline, a student support service run by volunteer students, which provides help during out of work hours. We look at why these support services are much needed and which steps that can be taken to set up a Night line on campus.

University Mental Health Day 2018

As our Student mental health and wellbeing series comes to a close, we look at Student Minds and UMHAN (The University Mental Health Advisers Network) University Mental Health Day 2018, the National Campaign sponsored by Unite Students, aiming to bring university communities together to speak freely about mental health.

“It’s all standard behaviour.” So what is all the fuss about?

There has been a lot of awareness raised recently around gender based violence and questions around the idea of standard behaviour.  In this opinion piece,...

Using a HeForShe ideathon to tackle gender based violence

As part of the Efficiency Exchange series on student mental health and wellbeing, Kate Williams shares with us how the University of Leicester addresses gender based violence on campus through the HeForShe campaign.

The Sensory Study Room at the University of Warwick

Supporting our students’ mental health and wellbeing requires both a wider strategic approach and attention to the needs of individual students. Laura Waller shares with us how the Sensory Study Room in the Library at the University of Warwick has managed to create a dedicated and accessible study space.

Student mental health and wellbeing – why does it matter?

While universities can do much to support their students by developing policies and practices, students can also benefit from the support of charities. In this blog Grace Anderson outlines what Student Mind offers.

EDITORIAL. Never Alone: Universities’ key role in supporting students’ wellbeing and mental health

Among the many issues universities are currently concerned about, students’ mental health and wellbeing have become a core concern. According to a YouGov’s survey (2016) a quarter of our students suffer mainly of depression and anxiety, or, mostly, both combined. The need to perform, financial worries, and being in a different and new social environment can all contribute to making students feel overwhelmed at times. The IPPR study Not by Degrees (Thorley, 2017), however, paints an even more disturbing picture.

How can e-learning support higher education after and during Brexit?

As the debate over the status of international students remains unabated and uncertainties over the likely impact of Brexit still unknown, Vitaly Klopot suggests the use of e-learning as a way for universities to continue having an impact beyond geographical constraints.

“The Sticky Campus”; improving our students’ sense of belonging through active learning, coffee and...

2018 promises to be an exciting and challenging year for universities and the Higher Education sector. Among the many less than positive news, there are also successful practices that make our universities stand out in the way in which they support their students’ experience, widen access and participation, and support their mental health and wellbeing. The ‘Sticky Campus’ at Abertay University is one such example. As Robertson explains and describes, the concept is simple and yet complex in its operationalisation.