Discover and share good practice for smarter working universities

How student innovation is supporting efficiency in education

Following the shortlisting of six digital solutions for Jisc funding as part of the Summer of Student Innovation, Rosie Niven catches up with one of the 2013 winners to find out the progress of his project.

Journey to the centre of the student experience

Mapping the customer - or in this case the student - journey is not in itself a new or innovative concept, however a small team at Lancaster University, approached the project in an innovative way. The project’s head, Claire Povah, explains its approach.

Six ways to give students a warmer welcome

First impressions count, which means welcome communications are among the most important we will send to our students. Based on a recent overhaul at Lancaster University, Luke Davis offers his top tips.
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Using service design techniques to map the student journey

Some universities are attempting to map the student journey in order to better understand the student experience. In this blogpost consultant Jean Mutton explains how service design techniques can help to develop a deeper understanding about what is driving students.

The Sensory Study Room at the University of Warwick

Supporting our students’ mental health and wellbeing requires both a wider strategic approach and attention to the needs of individual students. Laura Waller shares with us how the Sensory Study Room in the Library at the University of Warwick has managed to create a dedicated and accessible study space.

Finding ‘pain points’ in the student journey

Like all service users, students have their stories of where their experience could have been improved. Jean Mutton presents some of the findings from a Jisc study seeking to identify these 'pain points'.

“The Sticky Campus”; improving our students’ sense of belonging through active learning, coffee and...

2018 promises to be an exciting and challenging year for universities and the Higher Education sector. Among the many less than positive news, there are also successful practices that make our universities stand out in the way in which they support their students’ experience, widen access and participation, and support their mental health and wellbeing. The ‘Sticky Campus’ at Abertay University is one such example. As Robertson explains and describes, the concept is simple and yet complex in its operationalisation.

Students as change agents

Meeting students’ expectations is becoming more important for universities. Clare Foyle and Jean Mutton explore what institutions are doing to engage students in influencing change projects in learning, teaching and professional services.
We call it data students call it life

We call it data – students call it life

Big data will back up the new breed of personal tutors in universities. But Brian Hipkin worries that relying on statistics without a meaningful human context will create a support system that will ultimately fail students.
Change Agents workshop

Change agents: students driving curriculum innovation

Working with students to stimulate positive change in universities is increasingly becoming standard practice across the sector. Sarah Knight has overseen the development of Jisc's Change Agents' Network (CAN) which was set up in 2013 to support that. She reflects on this year's CAN conference and the benefits the network has spawned since its launch.